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Search Results 0 to 24 of about 25 (some duplicates have been removed)
of the taliban. i think that was a major mistake. the second was to allow the coalition we successfully built for the war and the peace conference disintegrate. iran had been helpful, rebuffed offers of further help. pakistan had at least been not actively and helpful but we failed to keep them up to that standard in the succeeding years. the third error which i failed to perceive was a failure to pursue reconciliation much earlier than we finally did. there were certain proportion of the taliban leadership that were prepared to be coopted and that would have collaborated new arrangements and instead we send them to guantanamo and send very negative signals to those who might consider coopting and being coopted into the new system and it took us almost a decade to reverse that policy. nevertheless, despite these problems and despite the fact that now more than ten years on, we are still engaged in a counterinsurgency campaign. we have come a long way than many of us realize and i think some of this is reflected in a recent poll the asia society put out a couple weeks ago which showed in disti
this application after he escaped from the taliban. this is how he lived in greece -- schering cramped quarters with three others with no windows -- sharing cramped quarters with three others with no windows. now all he wants to do is go back home. >> the people back home are expecting me to return a rich man. i borrowed money to escape, and i cannot pay it back. back then, i fled from the taliban. now, i will have to explain that. i am frightened for my life. >> the afghan refugee has a life here, but not much of one. he has had to rely on his friends, but they do not have much, either. instant coffee is the main staple, and they only get to eat on a good day. their only source of income was from working off the books until the economic crisis hit. now they have been replaced by greeks. there is nothing left for the refugees. hundreds come to the international organization for migration every day. it is running the government program for those returning home. we met up again with farouk and his co-travelers. in the past year, over 6000 people have left the country under the scheme. it has cost
in the fight against the taliban let's return to the killings -- against the taliban. let's return to the killings in paris, a leading member of the pkk found in central paris. police believe it was an execution-style killing. let's speak to our reporter from the bbc persian service who has been covering this for more than a decade. the motive for this, what do you think? >> obviously it is too early actually to predict what was the motive behind this assassination. i think you have to wait for the french authorities to make the investigation. but from the early morning here, if you look at the turkish media and some political parties from both sides of the aisle -- the kurdish political parties and the turkish -- blaming one another. in fact, today, the deputy chairman of the turkish ruling party said it sounds like an internal feud. between different factions within the pkk. the leader of the bpd, peace and democratic party, the french authorities actually did not hesitate or lose any time to find perpetrators. this happen that a very pivotal moment because last week the turkish
valley, that's an area which had been controlled by the taliban just three years ago in the pakistani army came in, launched a sweeping operation to push them out but in recent months we've seen the taliban creeping back in a couple of weeks ago, a couple of months ago, rather we had an attack on the pakistani school girl malala yousafzai who was shot by the taliban and today we had this attack on a religious congregation hundreds had gathered to hear a leader speak in the main town and the death toll in that attack was 22 and was seen as another sign the taliban was not back in swat, certainly starting to reassert their authority there. >> pelley: there was a third attack in pakistan today, this one also in quetta. who was the target? >> earlier today there was a bomb attack on a pakistani paramilitary patrol in the center of quetta. that attack was carried out by a nationalist group that later claimed control -- rather that later claimed responsibility for attack. the ethnic nationalists have been fighting against the pakistani army, against the state for about seven or eight years
is still around. >> indeed, he is. at least nine people suspected to be taliban fighters are dead after a suspectedu drone strike in pakistan's tribal areas. the target, three taliban compounds. it is believed two major commanders are among the dead, in the unsupervised bomb squads. that's the third u.s. drone strike in five days itch there was a sharp divide in congress between those who voted for the fiscal cliff bill and those who did not -- taxes versus spending. but will those differences come up again in the debt ceiling debate? we have jeff duncan, a republican from south carolina, and representative elliot engle, a democrat from new york. gentlemen, thank you for joining us. representative duncan, you voted against the fiscal cliff deal. tell us why? >> absolutely. we are not in this situation in america with our economy and our government because we have under-taxed americans. we are here because we spend too much money. this plan had over $40 of tax revenue increases for every dollar that was cult. it should be $44 for cuts fur every dollar increased. >> you voted for the deal
in october by the pakistani taliban for supporting girls' rights to be educated. she was transferred from pakistan to britain for treatment. >>> al jazeera set its sights on one of the world's biggest tv markets, the united states. the satellite television network acquired a cable channel founded by former u.s. vice president al gore. al gore and a partner launched the network in 2005. it's available to about 60 million households. the government of qatar owns al jazeera. executives hope to double the number of their employees in the u.s. to more than 300. this man runs the network. he believes al jazeera could make a positive contribution to news available in the u.s. they launched their english news channel in 2006. the network gained international attention for going behind the scenes during the iraq war. reporters asked tough questions about u.s. military operations and about the u.s.-led occupation. spokesperson say viewers in the u.s. make up almost 40% of all online viewing but the image has kept cable tv companies from carrying it and english language programs can only be viewed i
for reconstructive skull surgery in january or february. she was shot in the head in october by the pakistani taliban for supporting girls' rights to be he had kuwaited. s -- educated. she was transferred from pakistan to britain for treatment. >>> al jazeera set its sights on one of the world's biggest tv markets, the united states. the satellite television network acquired a cable channel founded by former u.s. vice president al gore. al gore and a partner launched the network in 2005. it's available to about 60 million households. the government of qatar owns al jazeera. executives hope to double the number of their employees in the u.s. to more than 300. this man runs the network. he believes al jazeera could make a positive contribution to news available in the u.s. they launched their english news channel in 2006. the network gained international attention for going behind the scenes during the iraq war. reporters asked tough questions about u.s. military operations and about the u.s.-led occupation. spokesperson say viewers in the u.s. make up almost 40% of all online viewing but the image has
to by the taliban. we will see a dramatic decrease of american dollars and soldiers being sent to afghanistan over the next several years. host: but you said earlier that aid will continue for at least 10 years. guest: i hope and expect that it will continue for the next 10 years. we should probably talk about where that is a good idea. the fact is, afghanistan and pakistan, that nexus, the tribal border region there that is poorly defined and poured a controlled is perhaps the most dangerous place in the world to the united states. it is where al qaeda and began. it is where the remnants of al qaeda still exists. there was a drone strike reported within the last 24 hours against terrorists in that region. that is an area that will remain a threat for the foreseeable future. we can conduct drones strikes, gather intelligence, continue to keep an eye on that area, stabilize it and influence the direction it goes, because that is the part of the world that puts the united states most at risk. host: a sovereignty issue for pakistan, but also, karzai is expected to bring up sovereignty issues for afgh
in the head by the taliban has been released from the hospital. malala was campaigning for girls to get an education when she was shot in october, and has been getting life-saving medical treatment in britain. malala is expected to continue rehab at her family's temporary home there. the 15-year-old is expected to have major reconstructive surgery in the next few weeks. >>> there's been a lot of talk about superstorm sandy aid, but another important piece of legislation also never came to a vote, the reauthorization of the violence against women act. wisconsin representative gwynne moore is a cosponsor and also a victim of sexual violence. >> i'm reminded of a time that i got into an automobile of a man i thought was a personal friend to go get some fried chicken, and he pulled in behind some vacant buildings, raped me, choked me, almost to death, and when i went to the hospital, i was encouraged by an advocate, this was in 1970s, long before there was a violence against women act, long before there was a rape shield act, and i took him to court, and indeed i was on trial. >> and that i
-old pakistani girl shot in the head by the taliban has now left a british hospital. the taliban had targeted malala because of her crusade to educate girls. she had received frequent death threats because of her work, and malala will continue her rehab in the uk before more reconstructive surgery next month. >>> and a big setback to report for venezuelan president hugo chavez. a top aide said a severe lung infection has led to res ppiraty failure. he's in a cuban hospital following his latest cancer surgery and he's supposed to be taking the oath of office for a new six-year term in just a few days, but you'll have to stay tuned for what happens there. >>> director oliver stone is best known for his movies but he's also an open supportero chavez and he made a film on the venezuelan president and his influence on the country and he'll be joining sue van malveaux here at cnn noon eastern today to talk about his relationship with the venezuelan president, only on cnn and it's coming at you in 50 minutes. i plugged in snapshot, and 30 days later, i was saving big on car insurance. with snapshot,
as a whole, and how they will sustain the fight against the taliban after most american troops are gone. when i say "most american troops," i'm leaving open the doors the president has for leaving behind a training advisory and counter terrorism mission of some thousands of troops. the president wants to do this as he did in iraq, the hang up as also in iraq is whether the afghani government grants a status of forces agreement that will give us legal immunity for our troops. that's the american military presence around the world. we have it now in afghanistan based upon u.n. and other considerations, but that expires in 2014. that's the key issue that they are looking at right now. what president karzaiments beyond some troops is military support in terms of funding equipment and also economic assistance. cheryl: not a lot of willingness on either side to come to an agreement, we hope there's a sense today on what u.s. troops are doing in afghanistan after 20 # 14, but there are some of the democratic party that say we need to pull all troops out of afghanistan by 2014 with the resurgence of
, one of which killed a taliban commander. >>> 130 trained mountain rescuers are combing a five-mile area east of seattle. they are looking for this man, 29-year-old curt rupert of lake city, florida. he disappeared three days ago during a skydiving trip. friends say they last saw rupert jump when he -- rather when he jumped out of a helicopter above the cascade mountains. authorities still hoping to find him alive. they say his parachute may have snagged a tree on the way down. >>> and cnn has learned that tomorrow, president obama will announce chuck hagel as his nominee to be defense secretary. the former senator from nebraska is a vietnam war hero and served on capitol hill for more than a decade but his confirmation process isn't expected to be smooth. athena jones is at the white house and hagel, athena, has angered some lawmakers, many because of the positions he has taken up on middle east issues. what has he done that could cause challenges, say, for him here? >> reporter: well, that's right. even though this is a republican who served as nebraska senator for two terms,
not going to work backward from what has been accomplished. we have seriously weakened the taliban. you know, the two remain resilient. we know they're still out there, but we've been able to take the battle to the taliban and prevent them from getting any territory they lost and we're continuing to do that. we are seeing a ansf and afghan military that is increasingly important its ability to be operational. we've gone through a transition areas and above of a 75% of the population of afghanistan and those transitions are working, moving in the right direction and it is the ansf providing the security with regards to all of these areas. in addition to that, we have and removing the fourth tranche in next year will implement the final tranche in this transition. so progress is being made. progress is being made on the battlefield. progress is being made with regards to the society in afghanistan. the house arab afghans is improving. is it everything we want? note. is it everything that we would hope they would be able to achieve in this timeframe? not yet. but we are moving in the right dire
made. we're not going to walk backward from what has been accomplished. we have weakened the taliban. they do remain resilient. we know they are still out there. but we have been able to take the battle to the taliban and prevent them from gaining an -- territory they lost. we are in seeing the afghan military that is improving its ability to be operational. we have now gone through a transition of areas that involve 75% of the population of afghanistan. those transitions are moving in the right direction. and they are providing the primary security with regard to all those areas. in addition to that, we have our and we are moving the fourth tranche and next year we will implement the final one in this transition. progress is being made. progress is being made on the battlefield, with regard to the society in afghanistan, the education and health care of afghans in it -- is improving. is it everything we want? now. is it everything we would hope it would be able to achieve? not yet. but we are moving in the right direction. i think we really have the opportunity to be able to put thi
, and that is, is that there are safe-havens as you mentioned inside of pakistan where the afghanistan taliban harbor, and the pakistanis are protecting them. we are hoping to make some progress with those safe havens as well. jenna: one of the reasons why that's so underlined if you will is because pakistan has nuclear weapons. no one really knows for sure human there is a big question about who can get their hands-on the tphaoeubg lar weapons in the wrong scenario, that is also something we're concerned about with north korea. we'll move onto this other sorry we've been watching, a strange one if you will. you have the former governor bill richardson who has made numerous trips to north korea. he's going with google bill schmidt saying it had a humanitarian focus. north korea recently tested another rocket are, and there has been increased pressure on that country. what do you make of this? >> i think the time is really awful. and it's disappointing they didn't listen to the administration. the administration -- jenna: they said, no, right they said we are going on this private mission. wash
, unfortunately, and the whole issue of the viral video. the viral video with the taliban. whether you see a distinction between armed forces and what the gradient is. sort of where that winds move. from an educational approach especially. >> okay, anyone? >> i was at a security conference and basically off-line. not a lot. >> okay so basically there was a court case in the video that was posted by a husband. someone shooting a bob mcdonnell character in the face. if i work for a company, maybe some of the people or customers wouldn't like that. i would still allow it to be kept private. i would say that you should have privacy settings. because companies don't -- you know, initially clients don't like women lawyers. and we have gone over letting customers run with competent people in their jobs can do. so i am completely comfortable having this off-limits employer might make decisions in this area. for example, an employer can't discriminate against you based upon your genetic makeup. but that includes they can go on facebook and see if you like the breast cancer association or if you are
around in afghanistan when they were hunting the taliban. >> right. >> will you just give us an insight on the problems that we face getting rid of, you know, these magazine clips where you can, you know, shoot off, you know, dozens of bullets in seconds? and some of these assault weapons that, again, are made for one reason and one reason only, to kill as many human beings as quickly as possible. talk about the challenges. because i know there are 40 democrats in the house that are going to fight getting rid of assault weapons. of course, most of the republicans are going to fight it. what's the great challenge there? >> i think that you're right, joe, and general mcchrystal was right, these are weapons of war. they are not weapons that you go hunting with or really that you can protect yourself with. you know, there is going to be a discussion. you know, starting today, we're going to hear it from governor cuomo. the vice president's having a series of meetings today. he's going to come out with a series of proposals very soon. assault weapons will most likely be part of that. we had
for stability if we're out entirely in two years and the taliban knows we're going to be out? and even with 70,000 troops on the ground right now, is that really possible? >> i think we've grown afghan capability a lot. but they've got to step up and actually use it. i think what president obama has offered is a strategic partnership. president karzai will be here this week in d.c. visiting president obama, and i suspect they'll be talking about something that is a durable, long-term, sustainable relationship which allows us to help without allowing us to do too much. >> have you seen the movie "zero dark thirty" yet? >> i have. i think the depiction of the raid really captures -- i went on about 150 similar raids. it's real in tenor and tone. the second is, they show a decade-long effort by hundreds of thousands of professionals day after day, year after year, despite sacrifices. i think it captures that well. >> you were part of that, and we certainly appreciate your service. >> david, thanks for having me. >> i read your book and very much enjoyed it, his new book called "my share of the ta
in afghanistan. in september his base was attacked by the taliban. it's his second tour of duty. >> if you are a parent or, you know, relation and the person is away like that in these incredibly dangerous and challenging things, i know you worry all the time. certainly every night, i worry. but, you know, he loves doing what he's doing. he's brilliant at it. keep his head down and protecting our troops on the ground. i constantly meet the families of those who have lost their sons or husbands or brothers or sisters. i have some understanding, at least, of what they go through. >> reporter: prince william has also been back at works a rescue helicopter pilot. even on new year's eve and new year's day, risking his own life to save other people. matt? >> all right. mi michelle kosinski at buckingham palace today. michelle, thank you. >>> by the way, we're learning mo r about that never-before-seen photo of diana on friday. >> this was taken before her marriage to prince charles and was marked "not to be published." a lot of people wondered about the man in the picture. adam russell. they wer
, that the afghan forces will not hang on to, sell it to, or have it capturedded from them by the taliban, and is it being a risk that what mite up in the hands of the haqqani network or potentially al al-qaa related groups? >> well, the defense secretary gave some information to the house in november about plans on this. he said the intense is to extract all equipment whose value to the arms forces is an extraction and recooperation. reallily, that is, you would expect that to include or have sophisticated equipment, but if we hope we do the southern route, pakistan, but we are negotiating northern rotes in kazakhstan and russia, but we can also bring equipment out by air, and as things stand now r there are no firm plans to leave equipment behind. there is no decisions to leave behind equipment x in afghanistan. if we do that, all relevant issues have to be looked at, but i think we should. if left to the afghan courses, we regard it in the same way. >> will export lines have to be issued for goods that are gifted, and will there be a need of approval for any such equipment? >> there's
Search Results 0 to 24 of about 25 (some duplicates have been removed)